General

Panacur suspension for dogs

Panacur suspension for dogs


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Panacur suspension for dogs and cats with severe diarrhoea and vomiting is a safe, effective and palatable preparation of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent dipyrone.

Dipyrone (or Pyribenzamine hydrochloride) is a long-acting anti-inflammatory agent used in human medicine.

This preparation is approved in Australia for the management of inflammation, pn and fever associated with the acute or sub-acute conditions of the mouth, ear, nose and throat (otitis, pharyngitis, sinusitis and tonsillitis), including associated signs such as pn, redness and swelling, in addition to the control of pn associated with inflammation of the peritoneum, and in the management of post operative pn and other forms of acute pn.

The manufacturer recommends a maximum dly dosage of 1.8g/kg body weight, however, in this situation, there is insufficient evidence to suggest that a minimum dly dosage is warranted. The product should be administered in a single dose (maximum 1.8g/kg).

Acute, sub-acute or chronic diarrhoea

A single dly dose of dipyrone is effective in treating mild to moderate acute diarrhoea, for the management of pn and inflammation associated with chronic diarrhoea in dogs and cats, as well as the reduction of diarrhoea in cats and dogs with chronic diarrhoea.

Acute diarrhoea may be associated with a variety of different conditions, including food intolerance, primary gastrointestinal disease (e.g. enteritis or gastroenteritis) and non-gastrointestinal disease (e.g. renal, hepatic or endocrinological disorders).

PURPOSE

Panacur is a suspension preparation of dipyrone for dogs and cats. It is intended for oral administration at a recommended dose of 1.8g/kg body weight once dly.

RECOMMENDATIONS

The label recommends that Panacur should not be given to pregnant bitches, lactating bitches and puppies as this will result in the development of a potentially fatal condition called necrotizing enterocolitis, a severe, often fatal disorder of the intestines that usually affects the very young. Pregnancy should be confirmed before treatment is initiated.

To ensure that an appropriate treatment regime is chosen, the dose of Panacur should be reduced as per the manufacturer’s recommendations or according to the recommendations below, to avoid overdosing (see table below).

Panacur may be administered to dogs with acute or sub-acute diarrhoea, including in animals where a diagnosis of chronic diarrhoea has been made, provided that the following conditions are met:

Acute or sub-acute diarrhoea is defined as an episode of diarrhoea which is self-limiting (i.e. stops spontaneously or within 24 hours), with or without vomiting, and which requires an appropriate treatment regime. It may be associated with different disorders, including food intolerance, primary gastrointestinal disease (e.g. enteritis or gastroenteritis) and non-gastrointestinal disease (e.g. renal, hepatic or endocrinological disorders).

The animal must have received at least one dose of Panacur within the last three weeks and should have been on a regular oral medication regime in the last three weeks. The dosage of Panacur in this case should be reduced according to the recommendations below. The dose of Panacur should be administered in a single dly dose (maximum 1.8g/kg).

When administered, Panacur should be administered at least four hours after the last meal, as this will reduce the risk of ulcers in the stomach and intestines. If an animal requires more than one Panacur dose in a 24-hour period, a fresh supply should be used.

In the event of overhydration due to a change in diet or illness, oral medication should be administered immediately to prevent vomiting. Oral medication should be administered on the opposite side to the diarrhoea in the event that the diarrhoea is not associated with vomiting.

Vomiting should be prevented if possible, as it is not an appropriate way to manage diarrhoea. Vomiting may only be managed by administering Panacur subcutaneously, or parenterally, to the neck or rear.

It is important that any anti-diarrhoeal medications administered are safe and that the correct dose is chosen for the specific condition and for the individual animal. If the condition is more severe, the dose of Panacur can be increased to 1.8g/kg body weight, provided that the condition does not worsen.

The label also recommends that Panacur is not given to dogs with diarrhoea associated with anorexia or weight loss, or any condition associated with hypocalcaemia (including hypothyroidism and renal flure). The label also recommends that Panacur is not used in dogs with diarrhoea of unknown cause and cats with diarrhoea of unknown cause, due to the associated risk of dehydration, which could lead to death.

PRECAUTIONS

Panacur should not be given to pregnant bitches, lactating bitches and puppies as this will result in the development of a potentially fatal condition called necrotizing enterocolitis, a severe, often fatal disorder of the intestines that usually affects the very young.

PRECAUTIONS IN PUPPIES AND KITTENS

Dosage should not be reduced in puppies and kittens for the same indications as in dogs.

The label also recommends that Panacur is not used in puppies and kittens with diarrhoea associated with anorexia or weight loss, or any condition associated with hypocalcaemia (including hypothyroidism and renal flure).

The label also recommends that Panacur is not used in puppies and kittens with diarrhoea of unknown cause, due to the associated risk of dehydration, which could lead to death.

PRECAUTIONS IN CATS

Dosage should not be reduced in cats for the same indications as in dogs